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Friday, September 16, 2016
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Friday, February 10, 2017
On-board systems for Space Applications
No
On Board Systems and ATM

The international scenario in the space sector is evolving rapidly. Avionic navigation and control technologies will have to be further developed in order to guarantee superior levels of functional precision, reaction times compatible with the high level of energy and speed involved, and autonomous self-diagnostics and management compatible with limited (or no) human-machine interaction. The intention, therefore, is to continue with the development and validation of enabling technologies for:

  • Autonomous GNC systems for launch and re-entry missions;

  • Dedicated cooperative control systems for mini and micro satellites.

The following are being developed in relation to the roadmap for Airspace Access Systems:

  • Tools for simulation of systems in unchartered environments;

  • Techniques for development and validation of Robust/adaptive control systems;

  • Sensor fusion for navigation and precision control;

  • Tool for Autonomous Decision Making,     

as well as: 

  • GNCs for space systems of variable configuration;

  • Re-Entry, Descent & Landing of high energy systems;

  • Hazard detection and management;

  • Autonomous Multiple Satellite Management.

Avionics navigation and control technologies are developed in line with the international scenario to guarantee better than average levels of operational precision, reaction times compatible with the high levels of energy and speed involved, and highly autonomous self-diagnostics and management.
On-board Systems for Space Applications

 

 

On-board Systems for Space Applications<img alt="" src="http://webtest.cira.it/PublishingImages/infrastruttura1.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://www.cira.it/en/space/sistemi-di-bordo-per-le-piattaforme-spaziali/On-board Systems for Space ApplicationsOn-board Systems for Space Applications<p style="text-align:justify;">The international scenario in the space sector is evolving rapidly. Avionic navigation and control technologies will have to be further developed in order to guarantee superior levels of functional precision, reaction times compatible with the high level of energy and speed involved, and autonomous self-diagnostics and management compatible with limited (or no) human-machine interaction. The intention, therefore, is to continue with the development and validation of enabling technologies for:</p><ul style="text-align:justify;"><li><p>Autonomous GNC systems for launch and re-entry missions;</p></li><li><p>Dedicated cooperative control systems for mini and micro satellites.</p></li></ul><p style="text-align:justify;">The following are being developed in relation to the roadmap for Airspace Access Systems:</p><ul style="text-align:justify;"><li><p>Tools for simulation of systems in unchartered environments;</p></li><li><p>Techniques for development and validation of Robust/adaptive control systems;</p></li><li><p>Sensor fusion for navigation and precision control;</p></li><li><p>Tool for Autonomous Decision Making,      </p></li></ul><p style="text-align:justify;">as well as:  </p><ul style="text-align:justify;"><li><p>GNCs for space systems of variable configuration;</p></li><li><p>Re-Entry, Descent & Landing of high energy systems;</p></li><li><p>Hazard detection and management;</p></li><li><p>Autonomous Multiple Satellite Management.</p></li></ul>

 Activities

 

 

Re-Entry Trajectory Optimization for Mission Analysis<img alt="" src="http://webtest.cira.it/PublishingImages/paper%20GNC-2.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://www.cira.it/en/space/sistemi-di-bordo-per-le-piattaforme-spaziali/gnc2-guida-navigazione-e-controllo/re-entry-trajectory-optimization-for-mission-analysis/Re-Entry Trajectory Optimization for Mission AnalysisRe-Entry Trajectory Optimization for Mission AnalysisThis paper describes a methodology for re-entry trajectory optimization useful for mission analysis. This paper has been accepted for publication (as Engineering Note) on AIAA's Journal of Spacecraft and Rockets.